1220 Park Street

It’s crazy to think the day has finally arrived that we would be saying goodbye to our Downtown location at 1220 Park Street next Monday (August 13th). We have spent months and years dreaming, planning, and developing our new tasting room that the time has finally come to move into our new place, which is exciting and surreal! But I cannot do this without reflecting on our Downtown home of 7 years.

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I remember texting Ethan, the evening before our first official date, to see if he wanted to help me drop off items for the tasting room we were slated to open in a month. It marked the first time hanging out with my future husband and spending time in the tasting room at 1220, but little did I know that this spot would be the location of so many memories not just for us, but for others too.

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We have been a spot for vacationers and honeymooners. We have seen engagements and acts of valor. We have watched as friends catch up and family members reunite. We have sat many times in conversations that have lasted hours and taken photos with new friends. We’ve seen and heard the quaintness of our small town like the hula hooper in the alley, the bagpipe playing in the park, the check ins from the twins, Brian and Steven, and the daily hellos from Happy, the friendly dog. I could go on and on of all the things that have taken place at 1220 Park Street in Downtown Paso Robles, but there’s just not enough space to really capture this spot.

While the conversations turn to echoes that go faint to silent…all those memories will not be lost, but instead will carry on into our new home at 3590 Adelaida Road. They will be memories that will warm my heart and cause for a pause and a smile.

Thank you to all those who have become such wonderful friends and to the Downtown community for accepting us. We will miss you, but obviously, we’ll only be 10 minutes away!

Cheers to the location’s new occupants, our friends, Diablo Paso! We know this special spot will continue to be a place that creates memories.

Looking forward to seeing you all at our new tasting room!

-Cecily

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Vineyard: Pollination Rows

A very beautiful, sustainable practice in the vineyard is pollination rows. This is something I just learned in the last year as my knowledge of this industry never stops growing, so I wanted to share about it as we are in the midst of spring time with lupin, mustard, and poppy covered hillsides.

Pollination rows are when we put in pollinating, native plants (wild flowers!) through out the vineyard. The mix we put down is allowed to grow for the majority of the season so the flowers can seed. This then becomes an open invite for beneficial insects such as the praying mantis and lady bug. These wonderful insects eat bad bugs such as aphids and spread the seeds into other rows of the vineyard. So, this creates an overall healthy environment for not only our vines, but the insects we love! Not to mention it’s absolutely beautiful. As you can guess this reduces our need for spraying, which always puts a smile on our vineyard manager’s face. The best part, since we’ve been doing this for years, is that it works very well. It’s a win-win for everyone!

Check out below the photos from last year that we submitted to the AG department. Thank you Linnea of our vineyard management company, Vineyard Professional Services, for sharing these!

Have a great Wednesday!

Cecily

Quick Fact: Did you know dust brings aphids into a vineyard (or crop)? That’s why we have signs on dirt roads that say speed limits in an attempt to control the dust. Aphids suck nutrients from a plant, which can stunt growth and wilt leaves. An infestation can create havoc and there’s only 4,000+ species of aphids. Cue the “More You Know” jingle.

White Shade Cloth in the Vines

Happy Friday all!

With it being Summer, it is definitely a time for enjoying the sun, but as we know too much sun can lead to a dependence on aloe vera and cold packs. This is true for grapes, the sun is an imperative part of grape development, but too much can lead to issues. Grapes depend on the sun for photosynthesis to occur, but too much heat and sun can lead to sun burns, excessive sugar, and lack of acidity. This can result in unbalanced wines with high alcohol. The flip side of this applies as well…too little heat can prompt high acidity and a lack of sugar. Sugar is a necessary part of fermentation in the wine process. As you can see, there needs to be a balance, like in everything, for grape development to be successful and lead to deliciously, balanced wines.

How do you put reigns on a natural part of creation such as the sun? Viticulturists have been using the leaves for years in their vineyards to help facilitate sun distribution, but there is now a shade cloth that can be installed to help create even distribution of light. We recently installed this white shade cloth in our Adelaida Vineyard (Paso Robles) to do just that. It not only has a purpose, but looks really lovely.

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I was curious about the shade cloth, so after seeing our new tanks at our production barn (winery) I drove around our vineyard and found a tall man walking down the rows straightening the white shade cloth. It was my dad (David Parrish).

“Pretty cool, huh?” He said with a smile.

“Yeah! It looks great, dad. So, I’m assuming the shade cloth is to protect the grapes from the sun?”

“Correct….”

Thus started my dad on the innovation and science behind this white cloth.

It started 10 years ago when my dad was working with Paul Hobbs. He was seeing a need for sun protection, but something that wouldn’t completely block the sun from the grapes. My dad had been primarily working with dark shade cloth for nurseries with his company A&P. So, he began working with a company overseas, but the white shade cloth was very expensive. It wasn’t until a year ago when he found another company that he was able to invent a cloth that would have the perfect weave, exact spaced holes for easy hanging, and it was half the price of the previous cloth. It was also reusable and came on large spools for easy installation. Finally, a perfect match for what vineyards were needing!

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So, what makes this white shade cloth better than other shade cloths? There is a science to it and it related a lot to what I know from photography. The white shade cloth helps distribute the light by filtering direct sunlight, but also bouncing reflected light from the other types of sunlight through out the day. This creates more even lighting, which in turn develops more consistent fruit in the vineyard. Therefore:

The viticulturist gets better yield.

The winemaker receives better quality fruit.

The consumer drinks better wine.

A win for everyone on the trail from grape to bottle. So, it is actually a really important piece of innovation that could help the vineyard/wine industry be elevated overall…just with the basic concepts of harnessing light. “Pretty cool, huh?”

After my dad got done explaining all the information to me, I realized that we had bonded over science, which is not something that happens as he is very left brained and I am very right brained. Although, as I write this, we actually embody what wine is…science and art.

-Cecily

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Adelaida Project: Rain & the Bridge

Hi all!

Remember I mentioned rain in another post, well, we have certainly gotten that! In Paso Robles, we’ve gotten to date 17.40 inches of rain. It is truly amazing to see the hills green and the lakes & creeks full. In Atascadero, the small lake there is full again after years of dryness and the frogs were certainly happy. There was a ribbit symphony the other night when we drove by. So, a lot to be thankful for!

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The Adelaida creek restoration is looking wonderful. The water isn’t shooting down the creek like it did in past years and instead is trickling down to replenish the aquifer. We are so happy. The RCD and Conservation Corp did a fantastic job!

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Despite all the rain, the construction for the new winery is still moving as Rarig and their team work hard on days of “no rain.” The big exciting thing that is now on the property is the bridge! The bridge looks huge, but it is not actually finished as there is the stone work to be done. I for one am totally looking forward to seeing that as it is going to be gorgeous. Our architect, Shana Reiss, is very excited about the progress too (see below) as we’ve been working on these plans for years and to see it come to fruition is thrilling.

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The Bridge shows up!

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Bridge in place

 

Hopefully by next time I will have some other great shots of the project. Until then, try to stay dry!

Cheers!

Cecily

Conserving Adelaida Creek

Happy Friday All!

We are THRILLED we got our permit to go ahead with the Adelaida Creek Restoration!!! Wait, what’s this about? Well, it’s something very cool…

Upon purchasing our Adelaida property, my dad (David), was walking around and noticed:”hey, there’s a creek bed!” Prior to us putting in our vineyard, from the Adelaida Road you would have never known that it was there. This creek is actually where the Adelaida Creek begins and travels almost the entire length of our property!

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On our tallest hill, you can see the winding of the creek in the middle. 

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The beginning.

Every year when we receive our 1 downpour (that’s a sad CA joke), the water vigorously takes the path of this creek bed and washes all the way down to the Mid State Fair Grounds in Paso Robles, which is about 12 minutes from our Adelaida Property. I’m not sure how, but according to our local RCD, that’s the case. Not only is it a mess for the city, but it’s a waste of precious water!

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Dry grass, weeds, and my feet.

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We tried putting hay bails in the bed this last year to slow the waters, but they blew out with a heavy rainfall. 

After talking with a local biologist and Fish & Wildlife, we were introduced to our local Resource Conservation District (RCD) who shared that they could help us restore the creek. So, over a year ago we donated the creek bed to the County for restoration. This means with the help of the RCD and California Conservation Corps (CCC) we will be cutting down the weeds and planting over 600 native plants. The plants will help slow the creek so that any time it rains the water will not just race down to the fair grounds, but instead will percolate into the aquifer!

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My little fluff ball enjoying a run by the creek and vineyard.

Work has slowly begun as we wait for the CCC to return from Louisiana, but there has been some work started from the RCD and AmeriCorps Watershed Steward Program to take down the vicious star thistle (I can vouch it’s painful to weed eat). This is really a labor of love and I so admire the work they are doing and will do.

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Thistle.

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Philip (RCD Restoration Specialist) starts weed-eating.

In the future, probably next year, the County will be hosting 4 tours of the conservation project to the public. And once our tasting room project is complete, we look forward to giving tours as well.

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Another above shot of the Adelaida creek.

A huge thank you to Devin Best and Audrey Weichert for leading the effort and working with us! It has been such a pleasure to work with you.

Till next time,

Cecily

 

P.S. Permit for our winery project is almost there, we will announce once it’s in our hands.