Wine & Christmas Movies

Cheers!

Happy Thursday!

It’s almost the weekend and I thought it would be a great time to share some fun pairings, but not the edible kind, more like the feeling kind. The holidays are (for the most part) very warm and fuzzy with wonderful family traditions….a twinkling tree, warm cookies, joyful symphonies, glasses of cider or wine, and Christmas movies. Christmas movies were a staple in our house and we had a list we would faithfully watch every year. We still do even if my parents and I aren’t under the same roof. So without further ado, here are a few of our favorite movies paired with our wines:

2013 Sauvignon Blanc – How the Grinch Stole Christmas, 1966

2016 Estate Rosé – Love Actually, 2003

2013 Silken Blanc – White Christmas, 1954

2014 Zinfandel – The Santa Clause, 1994 & Home Alone, 1990

2013 Petite Sirah – Christmas Carol, 1951

2012 Reserve Silken – While You Were Sleeping, 1995

2013 Reserve Silken – Miracle on 34th Street, 1947 

2013 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon – It’s a Wonderful Life, 1946  

It looks like I’m going to be busy with this list! What would you pair with your favorite Christmas movie?

Cheers!

Cecily

 

Serving Wine

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Happy Friday!

The seasons have surely changed here in Paso Robles with cloudy skies, showers, and autumn leaves. It’s definitely gotten chillier. With the drop in temperatures, it brings up what temperature is recommended to store and serve wine at? We get this question quite a bit in the tasting room, so with Thanksgiving just around the corner it makes sense to serve up some tips in preparation. I’m sure there have been moments of “How to serve Cabernet Sauvignon” when planning for the holidays, well at least this girl has.

Our PFV Wine List:

Sauvignon Blanc: 45˚-50˚ F for serving

Chardonnay & Viognier Blend: 50˚-55˚ F for serving

Rosé: 45˚-50˚ F for serving

Zinfandel (cool grape,lighter style): 55˚- 60˚ F for serving

Petite Sirah: 60˚- 65˚ F for serving

Cabernet & Petite Sirah Blend: 60˚- 65˚ F for serving

Cabernet Sauvignon: 60˚- 65˚ F for serving

Of course some prefer 40˚F white wine, or 70˚F red wine, and that’s totally fine. It reminds me of Blast From the Past with Christopher Walken’s character preferring Dr. Pepper warm, while most of the public prefer cold. Everyone has his or her preferences and that’s what makes wine like art, it’s subjective.

Wine Storage

For wine storage, the recommendation for long term storage is 55˚F. If you do not have a wine fridge (understandable), I generally recommend a regular fridge over a dark closet because wine ages 4 times faster in those conditions. What does this mean? It means that it will loose structure, color, and could possibly develop faults. I just wouldn’t plan on long term storage in a regular fridge.

Hopefully this information was helpful. We hope that your Thanksgiving is filled with warmth, love, and memories. I feel so thankful to have my family, good food & wine, and a home as I know that not everyone has these things. If you are looking for a way to give this season, we work with Must! Charities and Paso Robles has a free meal at the Centennial Park on Nov 23rd that needs support. And lastly, there is a wonderful wine event to continue the support of Santa Rosa/Napa/Sonoma in December!

Cheers & Blessings,

Cecily

 

When to Harvest?

Happy 1st Day of Fall Everyone!

It has truly been an interesting year for the 2017 harvest season in Paso Robles. We started out, well, hot and heavy because it was in the triple digit heat for about two weeks in August. We harvested our Sauvignon Blanc, which was not too early, but the Syrah and Zinfandel were not far behind it.  It looked like we would be done with all our harvests in late August and early September, but the heat spell broke with the scent of rain and blustery winds…monsoon weather. We didn’t get the rain and crazy microburst that Santa Barbara did, but the temperatures finally fell below the 100’s, which all plants and creatures, including us humans appreciated.

September showed up with the 70’s and 80’s, which meant a slow down in the fruit ripening. As you can see, grapes (most agriculture for that matter) are affected by temperature. More heat means faster ripening. Less heat means slower ripening. At this time, we are waiting on harvests, but how do we determine when to harvest? Here’s a breakdown…

Brix – We test the brix (sugars) of the grapes with a tool called a refractometer. Generally, the winemaker will have a number he/she wants as a target for each variety of grape. This is decided upon what the variety will become as a wine. All wine grapes have to come into the winery with sugars for the yeast to eat, otherwise no fermentation can happen. On the other side, when fruit has more sugar it means less acidity, so there’s a balancing act. We still need acidity in wine to help formulate the structure. Once we reach the desired brix, it brings us that much closer to harvesting. That said, it isn’t the only factor we consider in pulling off fruit.

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A club member uses a refractometer to see the brix of the Cabernet at our Harvest Party 2011.

Feel – We use the feel of the grapes to determine if they are ripe. This is a lot like at home when you have a basket of strawberries in your fridge, you will not only use the appearance, but the feel to determine if a berry is ripe to eat (or too ripe). So, this is true with grapes, we take note if the skins are soft and velvety as a sign of ripeness.

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Ethan analyzes the berries of the Cabernet Franc. – 2017

Seeds – We also look at the seeds as they help show how ripe the grapes are. The seeds should be brown in color and crunchy. The pulp of the grape should easily separate from the the seed when it is ripe. There are some seasons, like this current one, where we may have to harvest without the seeds being 100% brown because the flavor, brix, and feel say otherwise.

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David is reviewing the seeds of the Cab. – 2017

Taste – Taste is a huge factor for determining when to harvest. There have been times when the brix were at the desired number, but the flavor wasn’t. Flavor may be one of the most important factors because how the fruit tastes as a grape will impact the way it tastes as a wine. If we pick fruit that is too green, it will show up in the wine’s palate. If we pick fruit that is too ripe, it will mean very high sugars, no acidity, and heaviness (syrup-y) for the body of the wine. Of course for a port, you would want high sugars, so it does depend on a winemaker’s intent. For drier wines, we do not want green or over ripen fruit, but instead balance.

The Elements – If it’s going to rain, sometimes it means that we have to harvest to avoid mildew and rot. This does depend on the variety, weather temperature, and wind. There have been years where some rain didn’t make a difference, but others sadly did.

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2017 Cabernet Sauvignon

As you can see, it isn’t one factor that determines when to harvest, but many. That is why intuition, knowledge, and goals will ultimately determine when each variety should be harvested because some years it won’t be clear. Lastly, being in Paso Robles, the special thing is we talk with other wineries about harvesting. We learn from each other, which fosters a unique community of respect and care.  So, with that, happy harvest to all our fellow wineries and vineyards out there! See you in December.

-Cecily

SF International Awards

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We are celebrating new scores for some of our favorite wines. Judges at the San Francisco International Wine Competition acclaimed the 2014 Silken and the 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon as some of the best they’ve tasted.

The 2014 Silken received a Gold Medal and was awarded 92 points! It’s great that our flagship blend captured the judges’ attention and admiration as much as it does ours. We love sharing this wine and watching responses to it. It brings us joy that everyone likes it as much as we do.

The 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon received a Silver Medal. This wine is smooth with nice structure and restrained tannins. It’s perfect for easy drinking with jammy flavors and dark chocolate on the flavors. Just delicious!

The 2014 Silken is currently available for our Wine Club Members. Please contact club@parrishfamilyvineyard.com for more information! The 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon will be released to the Wine Club later this year. Thank you for your continued support as we move along this wonderful journey creating beautiful wines that will eventually be the cornerstone of our new boutique winery.

2017 – Another Big Year

2016 held a lot of wonderful and exciting things for us at PFV from our exciting news of receiving our 1st permit, working with our local RCD on the Adelaida creek restoration, and having our first 100% Estate harvest. With 2017 just beginning, we have another exciting year and a full one at that. Here are just a couple of the highlights…

Clone 6
Our very best (so far) is just around the corner and it is the 2014 Clone 6 Estate Cabernet Sauvignon. First, some may be asking, “What’s a clone?” Cuttings are made from an original vine that has the key characteristics of a variety (grape plant). A clone is just a slight variance from the original whether it’s stronger, concentrated berries, or repellant to certain flaws and diseases. Each grape variety has several clones. In Cabernet Sauvignon, there’s a ton. Winemakers use several clones to make a complex wine as some characters are seen more in one clone than another. Sometimes you can have an exceptional vintage with just one clone.

So, what makes Clone 6 special? My dad, David Parrish, weighs in on that:

“Clone 6, is one of those special grapes that I love and hate. The grape grower in me hates the Clone 6 as the yield is light, but the winemaker in me loves it because of the wine it creates.”

What this means is that at harvest the yield can sometimes only be 2 tons due to the berry size and sparse clusters (shatter). As a farmer, that is always a disheartening sight, but it is the character of that clone. Once in the tank, the color is dark and profile is rich. So, with all the hard work (and I can vouch, as it is my least favorite grape to sort at harvest) comes great reward. The reward is tasting and knowing it is a special wine. We have already received some great reviews over it from select media and are looking forward to showcasing it to our wine club this Spring.

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Development 
With the excitement of the site & winery permit approval (waiting on one more permit), we have begun to lay the foundations of our new project for our winery. The time frame hinges a lot on the weather. This year we have been blessed with rain! Last year, we were supposed to receive the monster El Niño, but it was more like a kitten’s meow when all was said in done. This year we have received over 5 inches (time stamp…we’re in January)!

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It has been amazing to see the Salinas River in Paso Robles flowing as it’s been years. This means that many of the aquifers are being replenished, so that is fabulous news for our community. So, while we finally are having a true winter season, it has definitely slowed our personal progress. In the mean time, we still have our wonderful Downtown Tasting Room.

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With that, as you can see, we have quite a year ahead. Be sure to come visit Paso Robles as it is gorgeous right now with all the green hillsides. It’s a little chilly, but we’ve got some wine to keep you warm.

Cheers!

Cecily

Harvest

With the welcoming of Autumn, we are definitely in the midst of harvest. So far in the last month we have brought in from our Adelaida Vineyard: Sauvignon Blanc, Grenache, Zinfandel, various clones of Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, Cabernet Franc and Syrah. It has kept us the busiest we have ever been, but it is worth it to have our own fruit in the tanks.

The toughest thing this season has been deciding when to harvest. Normally, we are waiting on the brix (sugars), but this year we are waiting on the flavor and the seeds to go from green to brown. We have certain brix numbers we want to reach with each variety, but going too far over will mean not only higher sugar, but alcohol as well.

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David & Cody talking about when to harvest this block of Cabernet Sauvignon

The weather has also been playing games ranging from hot-hot to mild days. The warmer the weather the faster things go, but with the mild days and cold mornings it slows things down. As farmers though, this is how it goes. The weather is always unpredictable; even with our technology, we cannot harness its wild side.

With the long days, one thing is for sure that we are at least spending a lot of time together.

Happy Harvest!

Cecily

 

 

Seeing Purple – Harvest 2016

On Monday we rang in the harvest season with our only green, golden grape-child, Sauvignon Blanc. It was beautiful and looks like it’s going to be a fantastic vintage! The rest of the season will be filled with blue, purple, and red grapes. Soon it will become a blur of purple as we will be harvesting a total of 11 estate varieties, forecasted to be 60 tons! This will be our busiest season ever, but our proudest.

Since 1995 we have been harvesting our own Cabernet Sauvignon, but this year will be the first year we harvest all estate fruit! Estate just means that it is from our vineyard. So, anytime you see “Estate” on a wine label, it means that the grapes came from that winery’s vineyard. Furthermore, it means that the winery has watched these grapes from slumber, bud, flower, veraison, ripe to juice. It’s a lot more work, but a dream for any winery. This is why this harvest will mean that much more to us.

So, what is on the line up…well, Sauvignon Blanc is one, but the other ten are: Cabernet Sauvginon (obviously, with it being us), Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, Syrah, Petite Sirah, Grenache, Mourvedre, Malbec, and Zinfandel. These grapes are coming from three terroir-diverse vineyards in Creston, El Pomar, and Adelaida, which are sub-AVAs of the Paso Robles District. Here’s a quote of my dad, David, from a recent article:

“Every year, the fruit is going to be different thanks to weather,” says Parrish. “But what we can count on are these three sites producing certain characteristics consistently. Creston, with its granitic soil and high calcium content produces grapes with beautiful color and flavor. El Pomar produces enormously round fruit and earthy flavors along with great mouthfeel. And in our Adelaida vineyard, with the mix of clay and calcareous, we get pronounced acidity, both full high tannins, great structure, and spice.”

This is why I find wine so fascinating is that every wine is going to be unique due to not only the variety, weather, winemaker style, but also the location (terroir) that the grapes were grown. As my dad says regularly, wine starts in the vineyard…how a vineyard is kept and its location will determine the grapes’ quality. So, here’s a cheers to the 2016 vintage as we feel it will be a great one!

Visit us next week (Labor Day Weekend, hurray!) at the tasting room as we’ll have out some of our Award Winning Wines!

Happy Harvest-

Cecily