SF International Awards

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We are celebrating new scores for some of our favorite wines. Judges at the San Francisco International Wine Competition acclaimed the 2014 Silken and the 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon as some of the best they’ve tasted.

The 2014 Silken received a Gold Medal and was awarded 92 points! It’s great that our flagship blend captured the judges’ attention and admiration as much as it does ours. We love sharing this wine and watching responses to it. It brings us joy that everyone likes it as much as we do.

The 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon received a Silver Medal. This wine is smooth with nice structure and restrained tannins. It’s perfect for easy drinking with jammy flavors and dark chocolate on the flavors. Just delicious!

The 2014 Silken is currently available for our Wine Club Members. Please contact club@parrishfamilyvineyard.com for more information! The 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon will be released to the Wine Club later this year. Thank you for your continued support as we move along this wonderful journey creating beautiful wines that will eventually be the cornerstone of our new boutique winery.

White Shade Cloth in the Vines

Happy Friday all!

With it being Summer, it is definitely a time for enjoying the sun, but as we know too much sun can lead to a dependence on aloe vera and cold packs. This is true for grapes, the sun is an imperative part of grape development, but too much can lead to issues. Grapes depend on the sun for photosynthesis to occur, but too much heat and sun can lead to sun burns, excessive sugar, and lack of acidity. This can result in unbalanced wines with high alcohol. The flip side of this applies as well…too little heat can prompt high acidity and a lack of sugar. Sugar is a necessary part of fermentation in the wine process. As you can see, there needs to be a balance, like in everything, for grape development to be successful and lead to deliciously, balanced wines.

How do you put reigns on a natural part of creation such as the sun? Viticulturists have been using the leaves for years in their vineyards to help facilitate sun distribution, but there is now a shade cloth that can be installed to help create even distribution of light. We recently installed this white shade cloth in our Adelaida Vineyard (Paso Robles) to do just that. It not only has a purpose, but looks really lovely.

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I was curious about the shade cloth, so after seeing our new tanks at our production barn (winery) I drove around our vineyard and found a tall man walking down the rows straightening the white shade cloth. It was my dad (David Parrish).

“Pretty cool, huh?” He said with a smile.

“Yeah! It looks great, dad. So, I’m assuming the shade cloth is to protect the grapes from the sun?”

“Correct….”

Thus started my dad on the innovation and science behind this white cloth.

It started 10 years ago when my dad was working with Paul Hobbs. He was seeing a need for sun protection, but something that wouldn’t completely block the sun from the grapes. My dad had been primarily working with dark shade cloth for nurseries with his company A&P. So, he began working with a company overseas, but the white shade cloth was very expensive. It wasn’t until a year ago when he found another company that he was able to invent a cloth that would have the perfect weave, exact spaced holes for easy hanging, and it was half the price of the previous cloth. It was also reusable and came on large spools for easy installation. Finally, a perfect match for what vineyards were needing!

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So, what makes this white shade cloth better than other shade cloths? There is a science to it and it related a lot to what I know from photography. The white shade cloth helps distribute the light by filtering direct sunlight, but also bouncing reflected light from the other types of sunlight through out the day. This creates more even lighting, which in turn develops more consistent fruit in the vineyard. Therefore:

The viticulturist gets better yield.

The winemaker receives better quality fruit.

The consumer drinks better wine.

A win for everyone on the trail from grape to bottle. So, it is actually a really important piece of innovation that could help the vineyard/wine industry be elevated overall…just with the basic concepts of harnessing light. “Pretty cool, huh?”

After my dad got done explaining all the information to me, I realized that we had bonded over science, which is not something that happens as he is very left brained and I am very right brained. Although, as I write this, we actually embody what wine is…science and art.

-Cecily

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Foodie Friday: Rosé & Berry Quinoa Salad

Hi all!

It’s almost the weekend and it is going to be a hot one here in Paso Robles! This calls for a crisp wine and light, refreshing dishes. First thing that comes to mind is our newest release, the 2016 Rosé. This Estate Grenache was stomped after harvest. Yes, like I Love Lucy, but with clean rubber boots and probably less hilarity…well, maybe not, I found it pretty funny. Anyways, this light, pastel pink wine has a nose of rose petals and a refreshing palate of strawberries, hibiscus, citrus, and a little bit of minerality. This could be enjoyed on its own, but if you are like me, we love food pairings, so what to pair with this wine?

A quick, fresh, and light Berry Quinoa Salad. The berries are in peak season right now, so it is the perfect time to showcase them. I love eating straight berries, but I think we all know that they are delicious on a salad as it’s a great contrast…vegetal meets sweet. The quinoa and candied pecans add some depth with earthy, nutty flavors. Then the vinaigrette picks it all up with a little zip and herbaceous notes. This is a beautiful and simple compliment to the wine. AND by the way, healthy with great antioxidants.

What would you pair with a lovely Rosé?

Cheers to your weekend and happy Friday!

-Cecily

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Berry Quinoa Salad
2 cups Mixed Greens
Hand full of Blueberries
¼ cup Sliced Raspberries
4 Sliced Strawberries
½ cup of Quinoa
Sprinkled Candied Pecans
Mango Basil Vinaigrette
(optional) Parsley Buds
(optional) Chèvre


Quick Candied Pecans
1 cup Pecans
1 tablespoon of Agave Syrup
¼ teaspoon of Vanilla Extract
Two pinches of Sea Salt (or to your taste)

Heat a saucepan, sprayed with cooking spray of choice, over medium heat. Add pecans, agave, vanilla, and sea salt. Stir consistently making sure the pecans are covered and don’t burn. It will take about 5 minutes for them to reach perfection. Watch towards the end not to burn the pecans because it can happen fast.


Mango Basil Vinaigrette
3 Tablespoons of Basil Olive Oil
1 Tablespoon of Mango Balsamic
Optional salt & pepper.
Can’t find Mango Balsamic, try a Champagne Orange Vinegar.



Pantry Links

Pasolivo Basil Olive Oil

Mango Balsamic

Champagne Mimosa Vinegar

Fully Cooked Organic Quinoa

Candied Pecans

Chevre

Talley Farms Fresh Harvest CSA

Adelaida Project: Rain & the Bridge

Hi all!

Remember I mentioned rain in another post, well, we have certainly gotten that! In Paso Robles, we’ve gotten to date 17.40 inches of rain. It is truly amazing to see the hills green and the lakes & creeks full. In Atascadero, the small lake there is full again after years of dryness and the frogs were certainly happy. There was a ribbit symphony the other night when we drove by. So, a lot to be thankful for!

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The Adelaida creek restoration is looking wonderful. The water isn’t shooting down the creek like it did in past years and instead is trickling down to replenish the aquifer. We are so happy. The RCD and Conservation Corp did a fantastic job!

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Despite all the rain, the construction for the new winery is still moving as Rarig and their team work hard on days of “no rain.” The big exciting thing that is now on the property is the bridge! The bridge looks huge, but it is not actually finished as there is the stone work to be done. I for one am totally looking forward to seeing that as it is going to be gorgeous. Our architect, Shana Reiss, is very excited about the progress too (see below) as we’ve been working on these plans for years and to see it come to fruition is thrilling.

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The Bridge shows up!

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Bridge in place

 

Hopefully by next time I will have some other great shots of the project. Until then, try to stay dry!

Cheers!

Cecily

2017 – Another Big Year

2016 held a lot of wonderful and exciting things for us at PFV from our exciting news of receiving our 1st permit, working with our local RCD on the Adelaida creek restoration, and having our first 100% Estate harvest. With 2017 just beginning, we have another exciting year and a full one at that. Here are just a couple of the highlights…

Clone 6
Our very best (so far) is just around the corner and it is the 2014 Clone 6 Estate Cabernet Sauvignon. First, some may be asking, “What’s a clone?” Cuttings are made from an original vine that has the key characteristics of a variety (grape plant). A clone is just a slight variance from the original whether it’s stronger, concentrated berries, or repellant to certain flaws and diseases. Each grape variety has several clones. In Cabernet Sauvignon, there’s a ton. Winemakers use several clones to make a complex wine as some characters are seen more in one clone than another. Sometimes you can have an exceptional vintage with just one clone.

So, what makes Clone 6 special? My dad, David Parrish, weighs in on that:

“Clone 6, is one of those special grapes that I love and hate. The grape grower in me hates the Clone 6 as the yield is light, but the winemaker in me loves it because of the wine it creates.”

What this means is that at harvest the yield can sometimes only be 2 tons due to the berry size and sparse clusters (shatter). As a farmer, that is always a disheartening sight, but it is the character of that clone. Once in the tank, the color is dark and profile is rich. So, with all the hard work (and I can vouch, as it is my least favorite grape to sort at harvest) comes great reward. The reward is tasting and knowing it is a special wine. We have already received some great reviews over it from select media and are looking forward to showcasing it to our wine club this Spring.

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Development 
With the excitement of the site & winery permit approval (waiting on one more permit), we have begun to lay the foundations of our new project for our winery. The time frame hinges a lot on the weather. This year we have been blessed with rain! Last year, we were supposed to receive the monster El Niño, but it was more like a kitten’s meow when all was said in done. This year we have received over 5 inches (time stamp…we’re in January)!

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It has been amazing to see the Salinas River in Paso Robles flowing as it’s been years. This means that many of the aquifers are being replenished, so that is fabulous news for our community. So, while we finally are having a true winter season, it has definitely slowed our personal progress. In the mean time, we still have our wonderful Downtown Tasting Room.

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With that, as you can see, we have quite a year ahead. Be sure to come visit Paso Robles as it is gorgeous right now with all the green hillsides. It’s a little chilly, but we’ve got some wine to keep you warm.

Cheers!

Cecily

Post-Harvest…the Juice

So, it was a 3 week whirlwind of grapes, grapes, oh, and grapes. On Wednesday, we took a moment with some media guests (thanks again Donna, Tyler, and Mike!) to just do some tasting. And what we found was the fruit of our labor has led to the beginning of beautiful wines!

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2016 Estate Rosé

Aroma, wow, does this wine have it. It was watermelon and rose petals done in such an elegant way. I kept wanting to sniff the wine. The flavor was lovely as the rose petals carried into the palate in such a delicate and loving way. Admittedly, I teared up as that’s just how much I loved it. This rosé is our first and it was made from our Grenache in Templeton. I cannot wait to release this wine! It still has a little more time, but I could have easily drank a glass of it the other day.

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2016 Estate Sauvignon Blanc 

It was a beautiful blend of tropical and stone fruit. I got white peaches with hints of guava and pineapple. It was light, but far from dull as the attack, acidity, and finish were all there. What amazed me with this wine was how delicate and sophisticated it was…it was at a level we hadn’t reached before with Sauvignon Blanc. The Sauvignon Blanc fruit came from our Adelaida vineyard.

2016 Estate Zinfandel

Because we had to taste a red, we tasted the Zinfandel, which had been barreled down a week or two ago. It was a wine in its infancy as it was still pretty bare of oak. That being said the fruit was there. Raspberries, pomegranates, and cranberries. It had touches of sweet cherry candy, but with time that will mellow out. I pictured Thanksgiving…turkey on the table with an herby stuffing. Since I am not a big cranberry sauce fan, I will gladly replace that berry flavor with Zinfandel.

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The other wines are still not done in the tank, but with 3 wines showing to be as wonderful as they were, I cannot wait to try the rest! The guys, Dad (David), Ethan, and Cody have done a fantastic job. The exciting part will be sharing these wines with you in the future. I think the rosé will probably be first, but the release date is unknown currently.

For now, stop in at the tasting room for our newest release, the 2015 Sauvignon Blanc. I’m loving this wine and we pair it with a Honey Chevre made by Vivant Fine Cheese & Central Coast Creamery!

Have a great Friday!

Cecily

Harvest

With the welcoming of Autumn, we are definitely in the midst of harvest. So far in the last month we have brought in from our Adelaida Vineyard: Sauvignon Blanc, Grenache, Zinfandel, various clones of Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, Cabernet Franc and Syrah. It has kept us the busiest we have ever been, but it is worth it to have our own fruit in the tanks.

The toughest thing this season has been deciding when to harvest. Normally, we are waiting on the brix (sugars), but this year we are waiting on the flavor and the seeds to go from green to brown. We have certain brix numbers we want to reach with each variety, but going too far over will mean not only higher sugar, but alcohol as well.

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David & Cody talking about when to harvest this block of Cabernet Sauvignon

The weather has also been playing games ranging from hot-hot to mild days. The warmer the weather the faster things go, but with the mild days and cold mornings it slows things down. As farmers though, this is how it goes. The weather is always unpredictable; even with our technology, we cannot harness its wild side.

With the long days, one thing is for sure that we are at least spending a lot of time together.

Happy Harvest!

Cecily