Vineyard: Pollination Rows

A very beautiful, sustainable practice in the vineyard is pollination rows. This is something I just learned in the last year as my knowledge of this industry never stops growing, so I wanted to share about it as we are in the midst of spring time with lupin, mustard, and poppy covered hillsides.

Pollination rows are when we put in pollinating, native plants (wild flowers!) through out the vineyard. The mix we put down is allowed to grow for the majority of the season so the flowers can seed. This then becomes an open invite for beneficial insects such as the praying mantis and lady bug. These wonderful insects eat bad bugs such as aphids and spread the seeds into other rows of the vineyard. So, this creates an overall healthy environment for not only our vines, but the insects we love! Not to mention it’s absolutely beautiful. As you can guess this reduces our need for spraying, which always puts a smile on our vineyard manager’s face. The best part, since we’ve been doing this for years, is that it works very well. It’s a win-win for everyone!

Check out below the photos from last year that we submitted to the AG department. Thank you Linnea of our vineyard management company, Vineyard Professional Services, for sharing these!

Have a great Wednesday!

Cecily

Quick Fact: Did you know dust brings aphids into a vineyard (or crop)? That’s why we have signs on dirt roads that say speed limits in an attempt to control the dust. Aphids suck nutrients from a plant, which can stunt growth and wilt leaves. An infestation can create havoc and there’s only 4,000+ species of aphids. Cue the “More You Know” jingle.

Meet: Lynn Parrish

We wanted to revisit getting to know our team as Parrish Family Vineyard is very much what it is because of our team. So, here’s your chance to learn more about them!

First up, Lynn Parrish, who is an owner and has been an integral part of the team behind the scenes.

lynnparrish2

What do you love about Paso Robles?
That it is thriving and growing, but still has that small town appeal.

Where is your favorite spot on the Central Coast?
My home in Creston where we planted our first vineyard (1995). It’s a little slice of heaven.

What are you passionate about?
Any project I tackle be it gardening, work on the ranch, or during the winter months some kind of craft work. And, of course, my 30 year long passion of weight lifting!

How do you take your coffee?
Black in the morning and half-and-half with sweetener in the afternoon.

What is your favorite dish?
Almost anything cooked in a slow cooker.

What is one job you’ve had before that would surprise people?
I was a firefighter for the US Forestry during the summer breaks when I was in college.

What is your favorite family tradition?
Celebrating the 4th of July at our place in Creston down at our little lake.

What is one of your favorite memories at the winery?
When David and I single handedly made our Cabernet Sauvignon in 2009.

David Parrish: Driving the Future of Parrish Family Vineyard

 

Source: Wine Industry Advisor

July 12, 2016 (Paso Robles, California)– As a child working the 740-acre vineyard planted in Atascadero by his grandfather, David Parrish knew he wanted a life among the rolling vine rows of wine country.

Years later after graduating from UC Davis, Dr. Mark Kliewer, the then-head of his alma mater’s Viticulture Department, recruited Parrish to assist in a 5-acre vineyard trial exploring new trellis techniques. The trial not only helped boost Napa Valley vineyards, his work led Parrish to develop 24 proprietary patents for modern trellising systems and structures that are still used today.

His trellising work caught the attention of the then-fledgling Napa community, and soon, in the late 1970s, Parrish was working alongside Napa’s most innovative grape growers, including the legendary Robert Mondavi.

Mondavi and his neighbors believed Napa could be a world-class wine region, and that it all started in the vineyards.

David Parrish helped them achieve that lofty goal.

“It was quite an exciting time. None of us knew we were making history. We were just going for it and working our tails off,” says Parrish.

“What I did know while working up there, and with Mondavi, was that this idea of transforming an area into a world-class region was not exclusive to Napa—that the same could be done in Paso Robles. To put it another way, as I finished up in Napa, I knew my work was just beginning.”

With the vision of continuing the family legacy on the central coast, David planted 40 acres of Cabernet Sauvignon on his Creston ranch in 1995. In 2004, David crafted his first vintage of Cabernet Sauvignon; in 2011 he and his family opened the tasting room in Downtown Paso Robles; and in 2013 and 2014 he planted 80 acres in the Templeton Vineyard, and 30 acres in the Adelaida Vineyard.

“Much has changed in Paso Robles since I was a kid working alongside my grandfather. We have become a world-class region and we’re dedicated to ensuring that continues for generations to come. Parrish Family Vineyard is proud to be part of this community that knows the key to great wine starts with the farming, and farming requires constant innovation,” says Parrish. “This brings up another thing I learned from my days working with Mondavi, that the key to success is to wake up every day with one single goal: to make each vintage better than the last.”

Today, Parrish Family Vineyard is a notable marquee destination for discovering award-winning Cabernet Sauvignon and Bordeaux varietal wine. David and his family will be opening a new winery and tasting room in the Adelaida District of Paso Robles next year.

 

David Parrish: The Veteran Wine Star Who’s Driving the Future of Parrish Family Vineyard